Sunday, October 9, 2011

Monarchs, the start of a long trip

On Friday, October 7.  I with my group arrived early on Gooseberry to view and photograph what may have been brought in overnight.  I did meet Greg Stone, who writes a blog about Gooseberry and who had posted yesterday on his blog about Monarchs that were present on the island, http://gooseberryjournal.wordpress.com/2011/10/06/now-thats-a-monarchy/

It was a beautiful day with a wonderful sunrise,sUNRISE D7K_4845 October 07, 2011 NIKON D7000 we had worked our way down to the self and of the island and found the Monarch Butterflies covering the bushes and goldenrod that were there.  The majority were angled toward the sun so that they could warm their bodies in wings so they could fly first to eat and then to travel on their long migration. untitled D7K_4961 October 07, 2011 NIKON D7000

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We probably saw, way over 100 Monarchs in the area.  It was a sight to behold, although, when you get tens of thousands of the Monarch Butterflies in the trees in Mexico, that must be really a sight to behold.

I did find one monarch, which had been tagged and I sent its picture to our local monarch expert who will eventually find out where this monarch was tagged.Monarch Tagged D7K_5061 October 07, 2011 NIKON D7000

So, when you go out for your hikes, keep an eye open for the monarchs that will be passing through.