Saturday, April 7, 2012

Tree Swallows at Allens Pond

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On a post
The ubiquitous tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) who, in the fall migration form large flocks that can number up into the thousands, as I wrote about in a previous blog http://photobee1.blogspot.com/2011/08/tree-swallow-swarming.html.
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Bluebird Box

















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"I Won"



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Argument


In the spring, the tree swallow arrives earlier than the other swallows occurring in mid March to early April.  They do not show up in the large flock numbers as they did in the fall.  On arrival , they start by picking out nesting areas, which could be tree cavities are nest boxes, utilizing  bluebird boxes.  Then it is time to pick out mates and battle other tree swallows for those mates.


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"Welcome"
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Boxes in the field
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Boxes by the Marsh
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Flying around a Box
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View from the field to the marsh
They like open areas, near water, and that includes marshes, fields and swamps.  At Allens Pond Massachusetts Audubon Sanctuary, there are a large number of tree swallows that are present because the sanctuary has such a large diversity of habitats, marshes, ponds, grasslands and swamps.
Once there are younger eggs in the nest, adults will frequently dive-bomb intruders to drive them from the area.  A big difficulty for both the tree swallows, and the Eastern bluebird are house sparrows.  They also will take over the nesting boxes and even destroy the eggs all young of the other birds.  The sanctuary staff will trap the house sparrows and removal from the area, hopefully they won't return and find another area to nest.
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Launch
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Landing