Thursday, December 5, 2013

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

Peregrine Falcon








Before I discuss interesting facts about the Peregrine Falcon, here is information that I got from the US Geological Survey North American Bird Banding Program about this Peregrine Falcon that we photographed at Parker River. It was banded on May 24, 2013 in New Hampshire by Dr. Tom French, it is a male and at the time of banding was too young to fly. So this Peregrine Falcon is at least six months old and looks like it's able to take care of itself. Photos are both mine and my grandson Kyle.

Bands on Legs of Peregrine Falcon
The Peregrine Falcon used to be known in North America as the Duck Hawk. The Peregrine and it subspecies is the world's most widespread raptor. In fact the only major ice-free landmass that is not found on is New Zealand. The only other land-based bird found over a greater area is the Rock Pigeon, which was in many locations introduced by humans. The Rock Pigeon in many locations serve as prey for the Peregrine Falcon.
Peregrine Falcon with Prey
Peregrine Falcon Feeding
The Peregrine is known as the fastest member of the animal kingdom and can reach a speed up to 200 miles an hour. The female Peregrine considerably larger than the males. They usually nest on side of cliffs but now have been using buildings and bridges around populated areas to nest. A pair of Falcons will nest for life and will return to the same nesting area annually. A female Peregrine will lay anywhere from 3 to 4 eggs, which will hatch in approximately 29 to 33 days.

Peregrine Falcons prey usually consists of birds including pigeons, doves, waterfowl and shorebirds.

Peregrine Falcon Feeding
Peregrine Falcon Feeding
Peregrine Falcon Feeding
Peregrine Falcon Feeding