Monday, June 18, 2012

Lake Umbagog, New Hampshire

I spent Thursday to Sunday, in the Great North Woods of New Hampshire, mainly to photograph Moose, but also photographed many other wildlife and scenes.
The group I was with spent Saturday afternoon until sunset cruising Umbagog New Hampshire State Park and National Wildlife Refuge on a pontoon boat.

 _D8C6011 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Yearling Moose
 
Information about Umbagog Lake from Wikipedia
"Umbagog Lake is a wilderness lake located in Coös County, New Hampshire and Oxford County, Maine. It is one of the most pristine lakes in the state of New Hampshire. It lies in the towns of Errol, New Hampshire, and Upton, Maine, as well as the townships of Cambridge, New Hampshire and Magalloway Plantation, Maine.  Thernames Umbagogis properly pronounced with the stress on the second syllable (um-BAY-gog) and is said toecomenfromn theAbenaki word for "shallow water".
The lake is part of  theUmbagog National Wildlife Refuge and a New Hampshire state park. Along its southernmost shore, there is a publicycampgroundr anda public boat launch ramp which may be accessed from New Hampshire Route 26. There are 26 wilderness campsites, accessible only by boat, which are located around the lakek. An interestingfeature along its northwest shore is an expansive natural floating island composed of generations of decomposing marshland vegetation.
The lake runs almost 11 miles (18 km) north to south. Its surface area is 7,850 acres (31.8 km2) making it the largest lake along the Maine/New Hampshire border. Its average depth is less than 15 feet (4.6 m), and its maximum depth is 48 feet (15 m).A deep section at the north end (aptly named "Deep Hole") may exceed 75 feet (23 m]tThet Lak’s area and depth wereemarkedly increased with the construction of a dam at Errol in the 19th century.
UmbagogLake  i fed by the Magalloway River, the Rapid River, and the Dead Cambridge Rivers. It isthe source of the A The name Umbagog is properly pronounced with the stress on the second syllable (um-BAY-gog) and is said to come from the Abenaki word for "shallow water".
The lake is part of the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge and a New Hampshire state park. Along its southernmost shore, there is a public campground and a public boat launch ramp which may be accessed from New Hampshire Route 26. There are 26 wilderness campsites, accessible only by boat, which are located around the lake. An interesting feature along its northwest shore is an expansive natural floating island composed of generations of decomposing marshland vegetation.
The lake runs almost 11 miles (18 km) north to south. Its surface area is 7,850 acres (31.8 km2) making it the largest lake along the Maine/New Hampshire border. Its average depth is less than 15 feet (4.6 m), and its maximum depth is 48 feet (15 m).A deep section at the north end (aptly named "Deep Hole") may exceed 75 feet (23 m] The Lake’s area and depth were markedly increased with the construction of a dam at Errol in the 19th century.
Umbagog Lake is fed by the Magalloway River, the Rapid River, and the Dead Cambridge River. It is the source of the Androscoggin River."
We left Errol New Hampshire and cruised down the Androscoggin River across Umbagog Lake then down the the Magalloway River and back. The boat was comfortable and everybody had enough room.
Some of our sightings included bald Eagles, Common Loons, Lesser Scaup and Moose.  The boat operator is a licensed guide and knows the Lake.  He cruises the the River slowly, pointing out sites and maneuvering the boat, so everybody has a chance to get their photos.
My equipment consisted of my Nikon D 800 with a Sigma 300 F/2.8 lens and a 1.4 converter and I utilized a monopod (Monistat of Switzerland), which has a large rubber articulating Fort, which helped to dampen vibrations.  Because we were on a boat and I wanted to keep my shutter speed to at least 1/1/250 of a second, I utilize shutter priority mode and set my speed and allowed the camera to adjust the f-stop.  It was a bright sunny day, most of the time and I had my ISO set at 200, but also had auto ISO selected in the camera.
 _D8C5830 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Female Lesser Scaup leaping out of the water with in water behind
 _D8C5904 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Bald Eagle
 _D8C5943-Edit June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Bald Eagle in flight
 _D8C5981 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Bald Eagle
 _D8C5997 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Bald Eagle
 _D8C6002 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Bald Eagle Nest with a pair of chicks
 _D8C6088-Edit June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Common Loon in water with green reflection
 _D8C6116 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Common Loon with wing flap after preening
 _D8C6120 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Common Loon with wing flap after preening
 _D8C6160 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Common Loon
 _D8C6226 June 16, 2012 NIKON D800
Late Afternoon on the Androscoggin River