Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Distraction Display

Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
After photographing the piping plovers yesterday, we noticed further down the beach a Killdeer.  We walked down to the area to photograph the killdeer.  As we approached the Killdeer started performing the broken wing display.  This was to drawer us away from wherever the killdeer had a nest.  After photographing the killdeer performing and we walked away.  The Killdeer went back to the same area where we originally saw the killdeer and when we walked back to get further down the beach, the killdeer again for from the broken-wing display.  Pass in the area where we had first noticed the Killdeer.  We look closely, but could not find the nest.

Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Killdeer showing Broken-Wing Display
Many animals use distraction displays to entice predators away from their nest or young.

This information is from Wikipedia
“Distraction displays, also known as deflection display, diversionary display or paratrepsis, are anti-predator behaviors used to attract the attention of an enemy away from an object, typically the nest or young, that is being protected. They are particularly well known in birds but noted also in fish. Distraction displays are, however, not very well defined and the definition has been the subject of much debate. They are sometimes classed more generically under "nest protection behaviors" along with aggressive displays such as mobbing.
It has been suggested that distraction displays exist mainly in birds, since they have the ability to escape at the last moment out of reach of ground predators. Displays are used mainly for ground predators, and are rarely used against avian predators
Several variations are known in these distraction displays. Nesting male three-spined sticklebacks, when approached by groups of conspecifics, will move away from the nest and simulate feeding on the substrate. Adults will feed on the eggs of nesting conspecifics.
 False brooding is an approach used by plovers. The bird moves away from the nest site and crouches on the ground so as to appear to be sitting at a nest and allows the predator to approach close before escaping.
Injury feigning is one of the more common forms of distraction. The broken-wing display is particularly well known in nesting waders and plovers and doves such as the mourning dove. Birds that are at the nest walk away from the nest with one wing hung low and dragging on the ground so as to appear as an easy target for a predator. Several interpretations have been made for the evolution of the behavior and the cognitive abilities involved. Another display is the rodent run, which is seen in plovers as well as some passerine birds Here the nesting bird drops to the ground or moves away, creeping along with the head held low and making turns as if dodging imaginary obstacles.
These birds will frequently use a distraction display ("broken-wing act") to distract predators from their nests. This involves the bird walking away from its nesting area holding its wing in a position that simulates an injury and then flapping around on the ground emitting a distress call. The predators then think they have easy prey and are attracted to this seemingly injured bird and away from the nest. If the parent sees that a potential predator is not following them, they will move closer and get louder until they get the attention of the predator. This is repeated until the predator is far from the nest, and the killdeer suddenly "heals" and flies away.”