Friday, April 29, 2016

Osprey at Nelson's Beach

If you are lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, then you have a greater chance of getting interesting photos.  The kids and I went down to Plymouth today, first starting off at Jenney Pond, where the Black-crowned night-herons were visible and interacting.

Next, we tried the Harbor, but because of construction, there was not anything interesting going on there.  Next stop was Nelson's Park, where we met up with the friend of mine lender.  While the kids were traveling down along the beach photographing the gulls, and other action going on Linda and I was set up near the Osprey platform and nest.  Hunker down in the nest was one Osprey and way across the way, in a tree was the second Osprey.   Its mate was on the nest as we continue to watch the male, it suddenly took off and flew toward the nest carrying a portion of fish.  The Osprey landed on the nest and deposited the fish for its mate who grabbed a the fish and then flew off to enjoy the meal.  The Osprey, who landed took over the brooding of the eggs that are in the nest.  This interaction gave a great sequence of photos, which were right on, focused.  I utilize my Nikon D 500+ a Nikon 200 to 500 at 500 mm F/5.6, 1/1250 and auto ISO.









As I said we were there at the right time and in the right place, and thankfully the wind was blowing toward us, and so the Osprey came in facing us to the nest.  If the wind were in the opposite direction, We would have needed to be on the other side of the nest.  The other item that was good that it was mainly cloudy and we did not have to worry about the direction of the sun.

What makes Nelson Beach a great place to photograph Osprey is the location of the nest and the Osprey are use to people.

 Remember birds will land into the wind and also will take off into the wind and with the clouds,  We did not have to worry about sun angle.  Remember when you are photographing sun, and wind direction is imperative into way you place yourself to photograph birds in flight