Friday, January 11, 2013

Thick-billed Murre (Uria lomvia)

Thick-billed Murre
It was Thursday again, and I was off again with Doug birding. We decide to start the day at Provincetown Harbor. The weather was sunny, low 40s, but with a stiff wind blowing. In the harbor, there were a number of birds and gulls, but the best finding was a Thick-build Murre. Doug first sighted it out in the harbor closer toward the breakwater. As we were observing the Murre, it swam toward us and down alongside the pier which allowed for good observation and some decent photographs.

The Thick-billed Murre is distributed around the polar and sub-polar regions of the northern hemisphere. They will spend all of their lives out on the waters except during the breeding season when they form colonies on cliffs. The Thick-billed Murre produce only one egg per year. An interesting fact, is when the young leave the nest, they jump into the sea where the male murre stays with the young and feeds it for approximately 8 weeks.

During the winter they will move southward, staying in cold ice-free waters.

They utilize their wings to swim under the water and they can dive up to 150 m and stay on the water for up to four minutes.
Thick-billed Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Thick-billed Murre